Where have we been…. What’s HAPPENED?

I can hardly believe that its been over a year ( and a half) since our last post…  seriously… Where have we been? What about the NautiKel?

Well… no excuses…  ( maybe one or two)  We have been in San Blas…  enjoying the complete lack of good internet connection…   back and forth to Shelter Bay marina, teaching students, having great guests as company, lots of family visits and general life on board….

We will try and get some fill-in posts in the next few days, now that we have good cell service…. Because, guess what..????

WE MOVED!!! 

We are actually in San Andres, Colombia!  Believe it?  True!    More on this passage later,

And more posts soon,

But for now we have been….

Learning to kiteboard ( yes at THIS AGE)

Enjoying restaurants,

Shopping

Boat repairs,

Internet,

Did I say Shopping yet?

Please excuse our lack of communication, and look for our in-between posts that will fill in ALL the details of the last year and a half.

A Year… Wow.. Where did the time go????

Its been over a year since we wrote a post… and for good reason…. Where do I begin?

We went home to Canada in January ( yes January), I know…we were crazy! But we had things to take care of , and we kept getting signs that it was time to go home, and sometimes you just have to follow the signs.
So we arrived in Vancouver to our friend Derrick and Mels on a cold Jan 4 night, with our flip flops still on, and quickly adorned a toque.

It took us literally MONTHS at home to finally warm up and not be shivering and cold ALL the time. Blankets on the couch, wool socks on, fireplace cranked up. We finally understood that blood actually does get thinner when you spend an amount of time in the tropics.

We literally went from bikinis and flip flops to THIS in 30 short hours.

Life went on in BC, and we finally asked ourselves what we were doing there. All we wanted to do was get back to a boat and float around, be sailors, and we longed for the freedom and ease (I say this word cautiously) that cruising life holds. It’s a different life, cruising. “Life on the wheel” as we call it- at home in “normal” society is hard.
Its expensive.
Its busy.
We found ourselves too busy to enjoy things, and hardly time to enjoy our family and friends. Why? We began to ask ourselves why we were there.

While we were home, we “acquired” our sons dog, whom we renamed “Mizzen” . Shes a beautiful Mini Australian Shepard.

Kris brought her to us in Pender Harbor while we had a weekend on a boat we were looking after. Mizzens first day on the boat was in a race with wind 20-25 knots. She did great! She began to love her adventures at the marina, and we continued taking her sailing for the remainder of the summer, on Wednesday night races and off day sails. She was very comfortable on the boat and loved the adventures.

October came around and we received an offer on the house. We accepted and off we went into our massive downsizing and reformatting of our life. What to keep, what to discard, what to send…. To…. Wherever it was we would go… still undecided. We knew it would be to a boat somewhere though.

Do you have an idea how much stuff people keep..??? I am not a packrat… I tend to discard things every few years… but MAN…. We had A LOT of stuff. STUFF. Why? When you live on a boat for a year.. you realize what little stuff you actually need. And its not a lot. We had more STUFF than I had imagined… and it too a few garage sales and many trips to the GoodWill to get rid of things that we just didn’t NEED anymore.

In November, we found Mischief, a Moody 42 in Panama, coincidently, at the same marina we left from in January earlier in the year.

Was this to be our new home?

We had our friends preview it for us before flying down and checking it ourselves. We decided that we would head back to Panama and re-start our adventure from there. If anyone who knows me.. knows how full circle this is…. You would be laughing out loud right now.

At the end of November, we said goodbye to our beautiful home in Parksville BC, and walked out the door for the last time. It was a difficult time, and we were lucky to have the support of our best friends that day. We had put a lot of time, energy and money into that home, rebuilding it virtually from the ground up.

It was a lovely home in Parksville, but new adventures await.

But it was time to move to new adventures, so we looked back one more time,… and drove off.

Our new life would be on a 42 foot yacht in the warm waters of Panama.

Monohull? We Transit the Canal as Crew

Well, its been a long time since we maneuvered in a monohull, and we casually offered our expertise to a fellow cruiser during a grocery run one day to help him with a Panama Canal Transit from Colon to Panama City. Besides the fact that we would do anything to get out of the marina for a day, Transiting the Canal is like a rite of passage for most Sailors.

John is on a solo circumnavigation on a Hylas 54 named ¾ Time. Its named after a Jimmy Buffet song, if your not familiar.

We recruited our friends Steph and Stu, and off we went for our overnight adventure to the “other side”.

Steph and Stewart of Matador

It’s a two day episode, crossing the canal in a sailboat. They give you a distinct passage-time, which,… of course, is adhered to strictly… strictly in Caribbean time of course. We motored around “the Flats” area of the canal zone waiting for the Pilot. This is when we found out there was no Beer on board!
NO BEER !!!

Darrens a happy guy, on a boat… and this is when Stewart realized there was no beer.

Our Pilot finally arrive at about 5:30 pm, when his proposed boarding time to our vessel was 3pm. All boats must have a designated “pilot” aboard who is arranged by the Panama Canal Harbor Authority. We actually had two,.. one for the evening passage, and one for the second day.

Our First Pilot giving Instruction to the Skipper

Night in the Canal.

We made it thru the first set of locks in the dark, all by ourselves, as opposed to being tied to another vessel. The Gatun Locks ( on the Caribbean side of the Canal) consist of three locks taking you from the Ocean into Lake Gatun.Once you have entered into the lock, the gates shut and water starts to fill (or empty depending on your direction) taking you the the height of the next lock. In multiple stages, you move your boat higher and higher ( or lower and lower) until the final lock where you will be at the level of the lake ( or sea).

GPS image of Gatun side of Panama Canal

Gatun Locks

Once there you spend the night on a mooring where the first pilot gets off and the next one joins you the next morning. We finally got time to eat dinner… Fried chicken tonight!
Beer..??? Not so lucky.

Most people believe that when going from the Caribbean to the Pacific Oceans, you travel from East to West, but in actuality, it’s a North to South voyage with a slightly easterly direction as seen in the image below.

Panama_Canal_Map

Morning came and our Pilot arrival time was 0730 and he was promptly on time again… Caribbean time, that is, at 1030. And off we motored thru the jungle lake toward the Pacific, all the while searching for Crocs.

Detaching from the mooring in the morning.

Searching for Crocs

Lunch on board was fried Chicken,.. or pizza, and soda… or water. Nothing gourmet of course, as it is a “guy” boat having just John the owner on board and his friend who was to help him get to their first stop, Hawaii.
Did I mention beer..??? probably not…

Skipper John and his friend

We carried on, motoring thru the canal, at about 6 – 7 knots, passing the prison which hosts Manuel Noriega News Article on Noriega being released from Jail

The Prison which houses Manuel Noriega

Snacks onboard was fried chicken. Or Pizza.
Without Beer.

You might be noticing a pattern.

Reaching Pedro Miguel Locks was like a turning point. For one, you can SEE the Pacific Ocean, and you realize you are almost there. As well, there seems to be a lot more boat traffic.

Much traffic on the Canal

more freighter traffic

Freighter traffic

Thru the Pedro Miguel Locks and the Miraflores locks, we were assigned to hook up to a charter cruise passanger boat. We were so relieved, for one, we don’t have to worry about lines up to the canal walls, and second,… THEY HAD BEER!

We were the entertainment for the boat that had the beer! The were sure curious about us.

Stewart was happy again, and he promptly purchased some from the concession. Life WOULD go on.

With Beer in hand. Smiles all around.

We were followed thru the Miraflores locks by a car carrier who made us seem almost miniscule in comparison to their enormity. Watching them bear down on you into the small space of the locks is quite a sight.

Pedro Miguel Locks

Looking South towards the Pacific.

When the doors open at Miraflores locks for the final time, a cheer was given all around as the Pacific water surrounded us. We celebrated with our purchased beer!

Canal Locks Doors are massive sized

We motored over to the Balboa Yacht Club, where ¾ Time would stay for a few days before heading towards Mexico and Hawaii on their circumnavigation.

John Being Happy to be in the Pacific

Our Pilot got off just before we moored down at the club and we headed up to the Club for a Beer!

Canal Pilot

Our Taxi Rogelio was there waiting for us shortly after our arrival, and we finished our beer and headed off with him again, back to our “homes” at Shelter Bay, but not without a stop at the Tienda….. for…

you guessed it…. beer….

Getting out of Cartagena, Cholon, and some GOOD news!

After being in Cartegena for over 3 weeks, Darren and I decided to head south to an anchorage called Cholon Bay. It was a 18 mile journey in light winds and soft seas. We were still waiting on news of Colins prognosis, and we thought that being out of the city may be a bit less depressing for us.
Colombia Google earth

Cholon Anchorage

Making our way thru the reefs, which are lightly marked, we were welcomed to the bay by the beach bar and the masses of boats there. It was a Wednesday just before dark, and many boats were just on their way out, but a few boats remained with their music playing loudly.
Palapas at entrance to Beach Bar

We found an anchorage with two other boats and immediately jumped off and had a swim in the cleaner water. It was a welcome treat after the cess-pool of Cartegena.
Along the mangrove lines shores of Cholon Bay are many beautiful homes and a few hotels. We found wifi in one Hotel Sport Baru http://www.sportbaru.com

Before we went into Cartegena, the bottom of the boat was relatively clean, but after only 3 short weeks, it was COVERED in a mass of slime and barnacles. After two days of cleaning, we could again recognize the bottom, and figured we deserved a beer at the beach bar.

We stayed in Cholon Bay for 9 peaceful, tranquil nights, with flat water most of the time. We did have to endure the jet skis and SeaDoo’s, who always seem to think that circling around sailboats is a fun thing to do. They should ask the Sailors what they think about that though.

It was a peaceful easy place to do some boat work, seemingly one issue after another, first the rerouting of the bilge pump, then the generator impeller, then the air compressor, Between trying to get the boat clean,.. we were constantly making a mess trying to fix something that needed attention; Definition of cruising?: Fixing things in remote anchorages.

Generator fix

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We did get time to dingy around, visit with friends, and visit the beach and the beach bar. We did find a beautiful little boutique hotel on Playa Azul, that was just lovely! A small hotel for 20 people, a beautiful white sand beach, and NO ONE there! It was a lovely spot for a sit on the pool chaise and relax for a few minutes.
Poolside Beers

Blue Azul Beach Hotel

White Sand Beach

On the way back from the beach, we saw an inlet into the mangroves.. and decided to go for a dingy adventure up the half mile long passageway searching for wildlife, We did see birds and crabs, but no snakes or wild things.

Mud Crabs

Indiana Darren and his mangrove adventure

Mangrove Adventure

In the meantime, while being at anchor, we got some good news about Colin. While he has been in the hospital for the last week or more, due to his increased pain with the radiation treatments, he has had many tests and procedures. He is under the careful attention and care of Dr Liz Kenny, in Brisbane Hospital, who has confirmed some secondary cancers in Colin’s hip and spine. Under good care and treatment, they expect Colin to be around for a few more years to come! Rum Punches all around!
Colin's on the mend

After 9 days in the jungle, we had to head back to the city for provisioning, to get some parts and wait for our next set of crew to arrive.
If you would like to learn to sail or just be part of our Adventure, send us an email or use the contact us in this webpage.
Sunset and Sea

Next post we will be headed to San Blas!

Cartagena, Columbia- As Interesting AS Can Be

At first glance, Cartagena is an architecturally beautiful city. The people seems friendly and the amenities are endless.

Entrance to El Centro

The city began with 200 people in 1533. During the remainder of the 16th century there was rapid growth. A major factor was the gold in the tombs of the Sinú Culture.  After those tombs were completely plundered, the inhabitants began to scatter to the countryside and to establish themselves as farmers, and the population of the city decreased.

A little later, the city had fewer than 2000 inhabitants and one church; the dramatically increasing fame and wealth of the prosperous city turned it into an attractive plunder site for pirates and corsairs–French and English privateers licensed by their king. Thirty years after its founding, the city was pillaged by the French nobleman Jean-François Roberval. The city set about strengthening its defences and surrounding itself with walled compounds and castles.

Jim, Blieu, Darren and I ventured into El Centro, the old town and checked out the food, the buildings and the shopping.

Calle in the Old Town

it was a 7000 peso cab ride from the marina to El Centro, ( an equivalent of about $3 CDN) for the 4 of us to jump into a Toyota Prius- type cab and adventure Northward.

Apparently, shoes is a favorite of Colombians as well. There are a TON of shoe stores.. everywhere. I wish I could still wear any shoe I desired… I would have been in heaven 4 years ago!

IMG_4937 Shoes Shoes, SHOES!!!!Lunch was just as amazing. At a whole $4 CDN we had a full lunch with a delicious soup, salad, piece of meat ( or fish) rice, and lemonade. We were stuffed.

PLATOS DEL DIA

And after, we couldn’t help but to stop and get a local indulgency.

A few days in the city and we had to head out as our water supply was low, and we couldn’t make water in the dirty harbor. We headed southwest to the Rosario islands. A quaint group of islands covered in private homes, these islands were a quiet retreat from the bustling city harbor for a few nights.DSC_0118

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We swam, made water, dinghied around, and checked it out. There are homes built on tiny atolls surrounding these islands, your own little piece of paradise. If you want a quiet holiday, this would definitely give you a piece of tranquility.

PRIVATE ISLAND PARADISES

PlazaBack to the city we returned, to get ready to fix some things, provision to head to San Blas and check out the city life for a few more days.

 

 

Jim and Blieu were to depart from Cartagena, it was a pleasure having them on board, and we will welcome them back anytime!The crew

 

 

 

 

Just a few more shots of this beautiful city before we leave you!

Church typical Street in Old Town

Jamaica- Our favourite Island of All

Jamaica

After an overnight power boat ride into the waves and wind, we finally put the sails up at 0600 and began sailing with a feeling of relief. Of course, as a sailboat you don’t always go directly to where you want to go… but we got there eventually when the wind shifted. We pulled into Port Antonio, JA at 1700 hrs, after a 110 mile passage with the towering 7000 foot Blue Mountains as a backdrop.
Arriving here feels like home.

We were immediately greeted by friendly Quarantine, Immigration and Customs officers who informed us that it was only 1600 hours as there is daylight savings time here. Bonus hour! After a lengthy yet pleasant paperwork session, we were given the key to the marina with its wonderful showers, pool and bar for a fee on the mooring ball of on $32/day.

Port Antonio was exactly how it was described to us; a bit rough around the edges, but a pleasant village full of friendly people. Our first questions to the locals were; where is the best Jamaican patties place and who makes the best jerk Chicken. Friday and Saturday are market days in Port Antonio, and the market was in full hustle when we went in for some provisioning. You can buy anything from shoes to ganga at the market. While they do take “no thank you” for an answer, they will try and sell you whatever they think you might need.

jamaica

Port Antonio in the Parish of Portland, JA is the richest of all the parishes. Its high mountains drop heavy rain on the area daily, making it lush and tropical. The farms supply produce to the entire island. Market day in Port Antonio is visited by people from towns near and far for their terrific produce. Among other veggies, we picked up a bottle of Jamaican Jerk sauce from Norma.

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Just off the marina is Navy Island. Once owned by Actor Eroll Flynn, there is an old hotel there that was closed in 2002. It has started being taken back by the forest as you can see, but was apparently quite the private resort in its day.

Navy Island Hotel
Navy Island Hotel

The old Eroll Flynn Hotel

After a weekend stop in Port, we headed west 30 miles to Oracabessa. Now this is a lovely little stop. We anchored in the basin made for a marina type development, behind a lovely breakwater owned by Golden Eye private resort that used to be owned by Ian Fleming. Its on the edge of town with a lovely park and well kept grounds. A walk thru the exquisite resort, with permission granted by security, we enjoyed the feel of the tranquility of this place. For a gentle fee of $800-$1000 per night, you too can stay in one of their private villas, or the grand 5 bedroom Ian Fleming house at only $9000/night. We stayed on the boat, but had a coffee at the bar.

golden Eye Private Beach

Golden Eye Resort Cabins

Ocho Rios was our next stop. Known as Ochi by the locals, it is a huge tourist town. In the two days we spent there, only two cruise ships were in, and I guess we were lucky. We anchored off the beach in 12 feet of water with a terrific view of the dolphin pen. We had our own show daily! We did the tourist thing and visited margaritaville, as well as the famous Dunns River Falls.

Everyone goes to Margaritaville at some point.. right???

In the many trips Darren and I have had to Jamaica, we have not stopped at Dunns. We were pleasantly surprised at the major tourist attraction that draws thousands of people daily. Our arrival there at 9 am beat the cruise ship people who only docked at 10, so by the time that we finished our climb and were enjoying a Blue Mountain Coffee, they were only arriving. Perfect timing.

We stayed in Ochi for an extra day and enjoyed some R&R in the lovely calm bay after our strenuous climb.
Beer Chair In Ocho

Jamaicas north shore is lined with resorts all the way from Ochi to MoBay. Our trip along the coast at the 20 meter line allowed us to guess at some of the names of the huge facilities. Sandals, Secrets, Beaches, Breezes, Riu’s and Hiltons bring thousands of people here daily on the jumbo jets landing at Montego Bay.

We have anchored down in the anchorage at the MoBay Yacht club just on the West side of town, and for a fee of $10 / per day we have internet access, pool and shower facilities, and a dinghy dock in a peaceful anchorage.

MoBay yacht club from the water

We will all take a few days off the boat here and enjoy the facilities at some of the big resorts, bathe on the white sand beaches, enjoy the endless air conditioning, eat at the all inclusive buffets, and act like a tourist for a few days.

See you in Negril!

The Inagua’s and Passage to Cuba

It was 65 miles to Little Inagua Island for the night then another 55 yo Great Inagua, on our journey to Cuba. It was nice to break the trip up into a few days instead of doing it all at once. But not wanting to check into the Inaguas, we only anchored of the shores for the evening before continuing on the next morning.

Dorado
Dorado

Little and Great Inagua are owned by the Bahamas, and are guarded by the US Coast Guard. While being at anchor at Little Inagua, we were visited by a Coast Guard Blackhawk, circling us very closely. They wanted us to know they were there and were aware of our presence at the island.

Coast Guard Bahamas
Coast Guard Bahamas

0400 we departed Great Inagua for the SE side of Cuba. It was a painful motor for 110 miles to the first available anchorage of Bataqueri on the East side of Guantanemo. We arrived there at 1700 and were immediately visited by the Guarda Fronterra, who took our passports to his office. He gave them back about an hour later, and told us we cannot leave until 0600 in the morning, when its light enough to see. They want to make sure you are not taking any Cubans with you.

Entrance to Bataqueri
Entrance to Bataqueri

We sailed and motored to the best of our ability the next day for our arrival at Santiago de Cuba, our check in place for Cuba. It was a painless experience arriving there and were radioed on the VHF by the marina upon approach.

Santiago de Cuba Marina
Santiago de Cuba Marina

After an inspection by Customs and Quarantine, the quarantine officer asked for some money to maybe help her out. $10 in her hand smoothed any possible issues and she was overwhelmed enough to give us hugs and kisses and many thanks. Immigration was not a problem, and we were good to go in Cuba.

Cuba has different cruising rules than any other county we have been to. We would be allowed to cruise from marina to marina, but not anchor in any of the bays, and we were not allowed to use our dinghy for exploring. It is very controlled. We decided our stay in Cuba would be shorter than anticipated.